Water Providing Ground

Water Providing Ground

Jenny Diez-Jones Adam Dwyer Harry Foster

Each year the entire residential district of the Veddel study area floods, causing detrimental impacts on the residents there. The majority of the existing ground floor spaces are derelict and unused, providing a daily reminder of the past flood exposure. Since the tragic 1962 flood, defensive mechanisms were implemented to avoid flood damage, involving raising the level of the dykes and creating overflow zones in which the Elbe River has more diversion space in times of flooding.
Considering the inefficiency of this model, the project introduces a strategy to minimise the volumes of directed water that returns into the canal infrastructures and instead lets rainwater seep through on the site, through the use of marshland. The strategy for flooding allows for the contingency of water to breach the area, but is managed with a degree of resilience; as opposed to prevention.
The design strategy aims to reduce the impact that flooding has on the area. It is also intended to address the social division and residential deprivation in Veddel. The ambition is to connect toether the 60 different communities that reside in the area. The project is comprised of; the land zone with the theatre garden, the knowledge quarter, the language and culture centre, social hub and the market of 60 cultures; the amphibious zone with social housing and the marsh & reed garden; and finally the water zone with the shipping channel, the floating village and the protective levee to control water flow.

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